Frequently asked questions

  • What are Tdap and DTaP?

    Tdap and DTaP are vaccines that can help protect against three serious diseases: tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough).

  • Who should get the Tdap vaccine? Who should get the DTaP vaccine?

    Tdap and DTaP are vaccines that can help protect against three serious diseases: tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that adults age 19 or older who never received a dose of Tdap should get one. After the first dose, they should receive Td or Tdap as a booster shot every 10 years. DTaP is recommended for very young children and Tdap is recommended for older children, adolescents, pregnant people, and adults. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist to learn more about the whooping cough vaccine and when it is recommended.

  • How often should you get a Tdap shot?

    Adults who didn’t get a Tdap shot in their adolescence should get one dose of the vaccine to help protect against three serious diseases: tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). After the first dose, they should receive Td or Tdap as a booster dose every 10 years.

    The CDC recommends that pregnant people should receive 1 dose of Tdap with each pregnancy, preferably during the early part of gestation weeks 27 through 36, although it can be administered at any time during pregnancy.

    Tdap is also recommended for adolescents.

    Talk to your doctor or pharmacist about whether you should receive a Tdap vaccine.

  • What is the difference between Tdap and DTaP?

    Tdap and DTaP are vaccines that help protect against the same diseases (tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis), but have different amounts of antigens and are used for different age groups.

    DTaP is recommended for very young children; Tdap is recommended for older children, adolescents, pregnant people, and adults.

    Talk to your doctor or pharmacist to learn more about the whooping cough vaccine and when it is recommended.

    Learn more about the difference

  • Is whooping cough contagious?

    Whooping cough is highly contagious, spreading easily from person-to-person through coughing or sneezing, or when spending time in close, shared space with others.

  • Can adults get whooping cough?

    Whooping cough is caused by the bacteria Bordetella pertussis. Whooping cough isn’t just for kids—it can cause illness in people of all ages. The severity of whooping cough symptoms can vary in adults, and symptoms are typically less severe for those who have either been previously infected or vaccinated.

  • What do I need to know about Tdap during pregnancy?

    To help prevent whooping cough in babies too young to be vaccinated, the CDC recommends that pregnant people get vaccinated with every pregnancy, preferably during the early part of gestation weeks 27 through 36, although it can be administered at any time during pregnancy.

    Talk to you doctor or pharmacist to learn more about the whooping cough vaccine.